Psychology of Weight Loss.  Losing weight and keeping it off!
Consider that only 8% of the people making a New Year's resolution actually keep them!  What we have now is a nation full of overweight people, nearly ¾ of all men and 60% of women!!
A recent study gives us some clues that the majority of people gave for losing weight; 31% thought that exercise would result in weight loss, 26% considered diet the main reason and 17% healthy lifestyle.  Another 17% thought that the cost of a healthy lifestyle was the biggest barrier to losing weight.
Turns out that only 10% of those in the study thought that there were any psychological factors involved in weight loss and keeping it off once gone.  Even if 17% of the people don't think they can afford a healthy lifestyle, which by the way is untrue, and don't even try to get healthy then you still have an enormous amount of folks that have some definition of activities that can result in weight loss but obviously fall short of the goal.  Clearly, if you consider how many people are overweight and they know the physical inputs to lose it, then we are left with some sort of psychological barrier.
One psychologist is of the opinion it isn't just what you do but why you do it, not what you eat but why you eat the things you do.  Some tips to help recognize the emotional connection you may have to food:
  • Keep a daily diary logging your food and your mood, and look for unhealthy patterns.
  • Identify foods that make you feel good and write down why you eat them. Do they evoke a memory or are you craving those foods out of stress?
  • Before you have any snack or meal ask yourself: Am I eating this because I'm hungry? If the answer is no, look for the root of your motive.
The goal is to take emotion out of eating and see food as nourishment, not as a reward or coping mechanism.
And keep up those healthy activities, exercise and nutritious diet.
To your health!